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Latest News43% of the World's Amphibians are in Decline

According to the IUCN, 43% of the world's amphibians are in catastrophic decline, or already extinct. This percentage is higher than declining mammals and birds combined. Amphibians are disappearing from pristine environments, as well as developed areas. Find out more about how you can help — starting right in your own backyard!

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  • Amphibian Foundation

    We’re an Atlanta-based nonprofit that leads one-of-a-kind conservation research programs to address threats in the southeastern United States and across the globe.
    We provide unique educational opportunities for all ages to learn about amphibians and inspire conservation.
    Established in 2016 by Mark and Crystal Mandica, we collaborate with partners in the fight against amphibian extinction.

    Join Us!

    The Amphibian Foundation relies on support in the form of annual and sustaining memberships. Our membership program provides the support needed to continue our conservation programs & gives members opportunities to get further involved!

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  • Captive Propagation

    ‘The only hope for populations and species at imminent risk of extinction is the immediate rescue for the establishment and management of captive survival-assurance colonies’
ACAP 2006 Report.
    Working with state, federal and international partners, the Amphibian Foundation develops novel, species-specific conservation programs, as outlined in the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan (ACAP 2006).
    The goals of which are always to experimentally release healthy captive-produced offspring into protected and managed habitat.
    The ultimate goal is that these species will no longer need our protection and will be safe, once again, in the wild.
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Mission: Dedicated to connecting individuals, communities
 & organizations in order to create & implement lasting solutions to the global amphibian extinction crisis.

Venomous Handling and Certification Program

Venomous Training Program

Working with the Rattlesnake Conservancy (TRC), we are pleased to offer a Venomous Handling and Certification Program at the Amphibian Foundation.

This 2-day workshop, developed by the Rattlesnake Conservancy, is a comprehensive training to prepare yourself for working with venomous snakes, or encountering them in the field safely. Using the techniques and protocols laid out by TRC, not a single person (TRC, AF staff or students) has ever been bitten by a venomous serpent.


The Rattlesnake Conservancy sets the standard for safety, husbandry, and protocol for working with venomous reptiles. Our Level 1 Program is the leading venomous training program in the United States and has been taught to over 100 students. If you are a land manager, environmental consultant, first responder, zoo professional, herpetology enthusiast, photographer, or private citizen looking to learn how to safely handle and relocate venomous reptiles, this course is for you! Topics covered in the course include:


Hands on individual training, guided by one of our professional instructors.

Handling methods for non-venomous and venomous snakes.

Learn about the life history, toxinology, and ecology of native venomous reptiles.

Emergency field care for envenomation

Methods of relocation


This course consists of 2-days of intense training with expert instructors. The first day of the Level 1 Course involves 8 hours of classroom work, where students learn about venom toxinology, native venomous snakes in their region, snake bite management, captive venomous reptiles, and disease monitoring and management.

On day 2, students take a written test on the information they learned the day before and begin hands on training with venomous reptiles. Students learn about the various type of handling equipment available to safely work with venomous reptiles, how to spot venomous reptiles in the wild, and handle multiple species and sizes of venomous snakes. Routinely, students will work with Cottonmouths (Agkistrodon c. piscivorus), Timber Rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus), Copperheads (Agkistrodon c. contortrix), and Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes (Crotalus adamanteus).

This course is applicable for novices and individuals with entry level experience, or may be taken by advanced individuals as a refresher on information learned.

This class is not wheelchair accessible